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Archive for November, 2010

 

Mark the Evangelist Panteleimon2Fol155v

§ 120. [A]t fixed hours time should be given to certain definite reading. For haphazard reading, constantly varied and as if lighted on by chance does not edify but makes the mind unstable; taken into the memory lightly, it goes out from it even more lightly. But you should concentrate on certain authors and let your mind grow used to them.

§ 121. The Scriptures need to be read and understood in the same spirit in which they were written. You will never enter into Paul’s meaning until by constant application to reading him and by giving yourself to meditation you have imbibed his spirit. You will never understand David until by experience you have made the very sentiments of the psalms your own. And that applies to all Scripture. There is the same gulf between attentive study and mere reading as there is between friendship and acquaintance with a passing guest, between boon companionship and chance meeting.

§ 122. Some part of your daily reading should also each day be committed to memory, taken as it were into the stomach, to be more carefully digested and brought up again for frequent rumination; something in keeping with your vocation and helpful to concentration, something that will take hold of the mind and save it from distraction.

§ 123. The reading should also stimulate the feelings and give rise to prayer, which should interrupt your reading: an interruption which should not so much hamper the reading as restore to it a mind ever more purified for understanding.

§ 124. For reading serves the purpose of the intention with which it is done. If the reader truly seeks God in his reading, everything that he reads tends to promote that end, making the mind surrender in the course of the reading and bring all that is understood into Christ’s service.

 (From William of Saint Thierry (d. 1148), The Golden Epistle: A Letter to the Brethren at Mont Dieu 1.120-124, trans. Theodore Berkeley, The Works of William of St. Thierry, Cistercian Fathers 12 (Spencer, Mass.: Cistercian Publications, 1971) 51-52.  Link for source, and other resources on the method of prayer known as Lectio Divina, is HERE.) 

(Image: Mark the Evangelist, unknown artist, 12th Century A.D., http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agiou_Panteleimonos_monastery )

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Click HERE  to link to a slideshow discussing the concept of satyagraha (translated from Sanskrit by Martin Luther King, Jr. as “truth force”), showing the roots of this concept in the teachings of Jesus, its development by Gandhi, its use by King, and examples of waging peace in the world. 

 

“You have heard that it was said, ‘Love your neighbor and hate your enemy.‘ But I tell you: Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, that you may be sons of your Father in heaven.”

Matthew 5:43-48

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Love, Embodied

“Dear friends, let us love one another, for love comes from God. Everyone who loves has been born of God and knows God. Whoever does not love does not know God, because God is love. This is how God showed his love among us: He sent his one and only Son into the world that we might live through him.”  (1 John 4:7-9)

Enjoy this video: 

 

Skye Jethani has said:  “Judgment causes us to see the other not as a person, but as a thing, as less human and therefore less valuable. And once we do that to a person or a group of people, it opens the door to all kinds of terrible evil — segregation, injustice, abuse, even genocide. . . . The Christian’s job is to agree with God that every person you meet was worth Jesus dying for. We cannot ascribe that kind of value and dignity to people and condemn them as worthless at the same time. It’s just not possible” (“Judge Not”, http://www.skyejethani.com/judge-not/595/, accessed October 29, 2010).

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